3 Easy pot roasts

Forget turkey, indulge in a pot roast this Thanksgiving!

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Fall is all about cozy dinners, don't you think? These savory pot roasts are comforting, filling and oh-so-easy to make. You may swap out that turkey for one of these roasts instead!

Don't think you have to be June Cleaver or Martha Stewart to make these incredibly succulent pot roasts. In fact, each roast is easy as pie and only takes a few hours of slow cooking to turn out perfectly tender and melt in your mouth. Serve these with your favorite mashed potatoes, salads or deep red wines!

Balsamic pot roast with mushrooms

Serves about 8 to 10

Ingredients

  • 1 (3-4) pound beef chuck roast
  • 4 -6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, quartered
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsnips
  • 1 cup shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup cherry-infused balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons fresh beef herbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large Dutch oven. Add the onions, carrots, parsnips, mushrooms and salt and pepper. Let vegetables cook until soft and browned, about 4 minutes. Remove from the oven and place on a large plate.
  2. Liberally salt and pepper the beef roast. Place the roast in the Dutch oven and brown on both sides. Add the vegetables back to the pan and pour in vinegar, broth and herbs.
  3. Preheat oven to 275 degrees F. Cover the Dutch oven and bake for about 2 to 3 hours, or until meat is fork tender.

Braised pot roast with gravy

Braised pot roast with gravy

Serves 6

Ingredients:

For the pot roast: 

  • 1 (3 pound) pot roast
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 2 onions, quartered
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 4 carrots, quartered
  • 2 celery stalks
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • Salt and pepper

For the gravy: 

  • 1/3 cup pot roast drippings
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2-2/3 cups milk

Directions: 

  1. Use the salt and pepper to season the meat.
  2. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven. Brown the meat on all sides. Pour in the broth and the water. Scatter the vegetables and herbs around the pot roast, season with salt and pepper, and drizzle with the remaining tablespoon of oil. Cover the pot and reduce the heat to low. Braise for about 3 hours, or until meat is fork tender.
  3. Remove meat and vegetables from the pot and reserve 1/3 of the drippings. Place into another pot. Add flour and salt and pepper. Whisk until mixture is thick and browned. Add milk and keep whisking until mixture thickens and is no longer lumpy.
  4. Serve pot roast with gravy and fresh herbs.

Slow cooker pot roast with carrots

Slow cooker pot roast with carrots

Serves about 8

Ingredients: 

  • 1 (3 pound) beef chuck roast, trimmed of excess fat
  • 2 medium onions, cut into quarters
  • 6 medium carrots, cut into pieces
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons red wine
  • Salt and pepper

Directions: 

  1. Liberally coat the pot roast in salt and pepper.
  2. In the basin of a slow cooker, add the flour and 2 tablespoons of water, stir to combine. Add the onions, carrots, garlic, red wine, Worcestershire and pot roast. Cover with more salt and pepper.
  3. Set to high and cook at least 6 hours.

More roast recipes

Red wine soaked pot roast recipe
Perfect herb pot roast recipe
Roast beef and caramelized onion grilled cheese

Claire is an aspiring nutritionist (and soon to be culinary student) with a serious addiction to bacon, goat cheese and online shopping. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. In addition to writing for the Food section of SheKnows, she is a full-time recipe creator (and taste tester), a writer for FabulousFoods.com and a contributing writer for the Home and Gardening section of SheKnows. You can also follow her musings and find delicious healthy recipes on her food blog, The Realistic Nutritionist.